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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you were wondering why the American Nose is slightly different than the Global nose, well it all comes down to gaming CAFE and the treadmill test...

Paul-san (what people at Lexus call him) explained that it had to do with the Corporate Average Fuel Economy regulations in the US–popularly known as CAFE. The CAFE is more or less the average fuel economy of a carmaker’s fleet being sold in the US market. If a manufacturer’s CAFE falls below a certain figure, the carmaker is penalized.

So Lexus will classify the NX as a light truck in the US because this category has a lower fuel economy standard than the car/sedan segment. Thus, the impact on Toyota’s overall CAFE (in CAFE terms, Toyota, Scion and Lexus count as one entity) will be minimized. How does this concern the altered NX nose? Well, there are several parameters for classifying a vehicle as a light truck. One is simply to have a certain approach angle. That’s why the US NX has a slanted nose.

 

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Truck! Yeah right, not exactly an F150. I have a PT cruiser and it's classified as a truck too, when in reality it's just a tall 5 door small car, all this classification crap doesn't make sense sometimes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Truck! Yeah right, not exactly an F150. I have a PT cruiser and it's classified as a truck too, when in reality it's just a tall 5 door small car, all this classification crap doesn't make sense sometimes.
I agree, its pure subterfuge designed to circumvent regulations. This is the single reason behind the death of the wagon. A wagon would still be considered a sedan, while a SUV is not, hence the wagon had to go. We we're told no one wanted wagons, what we we'rent told is that the manufacturers didn't want US to BUY wagons. Hows that one for capitalism, sounds like mercantilism ;)

Sorry for the rant, if someone made a decently affordable wagon that wasn't german I wouldn't be here...
 

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I like how the north american version doesn't have a front llicense plate bracket, always liked the front ends of my vehicles loooking cleaner.
 

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I like it better with the shorter nose. It's annoying when companies make decisions just to get out of whatever regulations are around. Not sure if that's more a problem with the regulations or the company itself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I like how the north american version doesn't have a front llicense plate bracket, always liked the front ends of my vehicles loooking cleaner.
Depends where in NA, some states/provinces have mandatory FLB's

I like it better with the shorter nose. It's annoying when companies make decisions just to get out of whatever regulations are around. Not sure if that's more a problem with the regulations or the company itself.
I don't see how that makes it 'annoying'. Its a problem with the regulations, innovation is inherently a circumvention of the rules. Lexus isn't being innovative here granted, but if you're not cheating you're not trying.

I had a 2005 magnum, was nice and affordable. Msrp $29,995 with the 5.7L V8.
So lovely those were, but I meant now >:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
another piece on the circumvention. This is not really a detraction but more an interesting look at how toothless the regulations really are. In theory CAFE is commendable, but in practice it sucks, downright on its knees, SUCKS!

To recap quickly, CAFE splits vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating (GWVR) under 8,500 lbs into two categories: cars and light trucks. Each vehicle has a “footprint” formula based on the vehicle size, with fuel economy targets it must meet. These are added up to a “fleet average” for each manufacturer, and there are a whole host of byzantine rules regarding “credits” for different technologies, like start-stop systems, hybrids and EVs that can be applied. They key concept here is that two vehicles can be the same “footprint”, but the “light truck” has to meet a fuel economy standard that is less stringent than the “car” standard. This (along with market forces) has been one reason why crossovers have become such a prominent segment in the American auto market.
http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/20...s-different-fascia-to-qualify-as-light-truck/
 
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